FAQ

  • 1. Cable Fault Locators
  • 2. Cathodic Protection & Pipeline Products
  • 3. Electronic Marker Locators
  • 4. Gas and Water Leak Detection
  • 5. GPS Solutions
  • 6. Ground Penetrating Radar
  • 7. Inspection Cameras
  • 8. Line Construction
  • 9. Metal Detectors / Magnetic Locators
  • 10. Pipe and Cable Locators
  • 11. Specialized Locating Accessories
  • 12. Air Powered Excavation Equipment
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  • 1. What Type of Cable Fault Locators do we Offer?
     

    We sell three (3) types of Cable Fault Locators:
    a) Riser Bond TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer), also called Metallic TDR or Cable Radar
    b) Radiodetection A-Frame or ACVG (Alternating Current Voltage Gradient)
    c) Radiodetection/Bicotest T272 – High Resistance Fault Bridge

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  • 2. Can the faulted cable be energized during the test?
     

    NO, the cable to be tested must be disconnected and must not have any voltage during the test. There are some exceptions. Please contact Eastcom Associates for further details.

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  • 3. What kinds of Cable Faults can I Find with a TDR?
     

    A TDR is used to identify “Opens” and “Shorts” in twisted pair cable (telecom and signaling), coaxial cable, and any kind of cable where two (2) conductors are present such a power distribution cable with a center conductor and a concentric neutral.
    The TDR will indicate the distance to the fault.

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  • 4. My TDR is consistently off by ### feet every time I use it. Should I return it for calibration?
     

    A distance-to-fault error is most commonly caused by either:

    1. an error in the VOP (Velocity of Propagation) selected for the cable under test;
    2. or by the fault being far away.
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  • 5. How do I correct VOP errors on my TDR?
     

    Make sure to use the correct VOP for the cable under test. The proper VOP for the cable tested in the field can be found in two ways:

    1. by testing a known length of the same type of cable back in your shop or warehouse, and adjusting the VOP on the TDR until the value read on the screen equals the length of test cable laid out on the floor – minimum 100 ft.
    2. by “creating” a fault somewhere along the cable in the field, for example disconnecting a tap and shorting it, then accurately measuring the length of cable between the TDR and this shorted tap, and re-adjusting the VOP until the measured value is shown on the TDR’s display.
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  • 6. How can I reduce Distance Errors in the TDR?
     
    1. Place the Cursor at the Beginning of where the trace deviates from the horizontal, NOT at the center of the fault.
    2. Get closer to the fault. Distance errors are measured in Percentage. A 1% error is:
      1. 10 ft in a fault indicated 1000ft away
      2. 1 ft in a fault 100 ft away
    3. Shoot the fault from both ends.
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  • 1. What is Cathodic Protection?
     

    Cathodic Protection (CP) is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell.[1] A simple method of protection connects the metal to be protected to a more easily corroded "sacrificial metal" to act as the anode. The sacrificial metal then corrodes instead of the protected metal. For structures such as long pipelines, where passive galvanic cathodic protection is not adequate, an external DC electrical power source is used to provide sufficient current.

    Cathodic protection systems protect a wide range of metallic structures in various environments. Common applications are: steel water or fuel pipelines and steel storage tanks such as home water heaters; steel pierpiles; ship and boat hulls; offshore oil platforms and onshore oil well casings; offshore wind farm foundations and metal reinforcement bars in concrete buildings and structures. Another common application is ingalvanized steel, in which a sacrificial coating of zinc on steel parts protects them from rust.

    Cathodic protection can, in some cases, prevent stress corrosion cracking.

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  • 1. What is Ground Penetrating Radar?
     

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a geophysical method that uses radar pulses to image the subsurface. This nondestructive method uses electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (UHF/VHF frequencies) of the radio spectrum, and detects the reflected signals from subsurface structures.

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  • 1. How do Pipe and Cable Locators work?
     

    They work by locating an electromagnetic field, a “radio frequency” field that propagates from an underground conductor. For more information about the Theory of Locating, please refer to the Publication entitled “ABC & XYZ of Locating Buried Pipes and Cables” which can be downloaded from our website HERE

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  • 2. What kinds of Pipe or Cables can I locate?
     

    Pipe and Cable Locators locate only metallic pipes or cables. For example a Copper or galvanized steel water service line, cast iron water mains, a steel pipeline, a telephone cable, a power line.

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  • 3. Can I use a Pipe and Cable Locator to locate a plastic water line?
     

    For all locating purposes, water is NOT a good conductor of electricity. Drinking water is approx. 100 million times less conductive than Copper. It is not possible to use a Pipe and Cable Locator to locate a non-metallic pipe or duct, unless a DuctHunter (detectable rod), a FlexiTrace, or a sonde are inserted into the pipe. More information HERE.

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  • 4. What can I use as ground, I am working on a paved parking lot?
     

    You can use a ground extension wire to help you reach a good ground. Otherwise look for signs with metallic posts, fences, guard rails, a manhole’s rim, or other metallic structures that may be contacting the ground underneath the pavement. You can also try to wet the pavement with water and place a metal plate over it, then use this metal plate as your ground. The latter may require you to use a higher frequency on your locator (33 kHz or higher).

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  • 5. How do I know if my ground is good?
     

    The transmitter will indicate the quality of your connection to both the target line and also to ground. Some transmitters produce an audible tone that changes to a lower pitch once a good connection is made. Others show its output in units of electrical current – mA (mili Amps). If you make all connections and the transmitter’s tone does not change, or your current output shows 0 mA, then your connection is not good.

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  • 1. Air Powered Excavation Equipment
     
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